Ann Reardon

 

What Cream Should I use?

There have been so many questions about cream that I thought I’d dedicate and entire page to it.

Firstly what is cream?  Cream is the fat found in milk.  When I was a child we had our own goats.  After milking them we’d of course put the milk in the fridge.  By the next morning the cream would have risen to the top of the milk and be sitting there as a layer.  Most milk that you buy now is homogenized to make the droplets of cream so small that is stays suspended in the milk.

Cream goes by many different names in many countries and it can also range in fat content.  To get a similar result you want to use one that is similar to the fat content of the one used in the recipe.

In my recipes I use Australian ‘pure cream’ which is around 35% fat.  So what can you use instead?

Australia:  Pure Cream (35% fat) or thickened cream (35% fat plus has a small amount of gelling agent to make it appear a little thicker and stabilize it when whipped)

Brazil: Creme de leite fresco

Canada: Whipping cream (30-35% fat)

Denmark: piskefløde (38% fat)

cream % fat

 

 

 

 

 

Finland: kuohukerma (30%-40% fat)

cream10

 

 

 

 

 

France: Crème Florette or crème fraîche entière fluide 30%

cream in france

 

 

 

 

 

Germany: Schlagsahne (30% fat)

types of cream

 

 

 

 

 

Guatemala: Crema para batir (33% fat)

what time of cream to use

 

 

 

 

 

Ireland : Fresh Cream (38% fat)

types of cream

 

 

 

 

 

Netherlands: 30-40% vet Slagroom
what is cream

 

 

 

 

 

New Zealand: fresh cream (36% fat)

what cream to use howtocookthat

 

 

 

 

 

Norway: Kremfløte (38% fat)

flote whipping cream

 

 

 

 

 

Pakistan:  milkpack cream 30% milk fat OR olpers cream  40%

what cream in pakistan

 

 

 

 

 

Poland: Śmietana kremówka  (30% fat)

cream in poland

 

 

 

 

 

Romania: smantana dulce pentru frisca (33% fat)

what is cream called in romania

 

 

 

 

 

Saudi Arabia: almarai (المراعي) whipping cream (كريمة خفق)

(35 % fat)

what is cream

 

 

 

 

 
ITALY:  Panna de Montare – Italian Kitchen Cream (35% fat)

cream-italy

 

INDIA:  Tropolite (This is a non-dairy product with 35-40% fat that will work well for decorating)

tropholite-india
 

SWEDEN: Vispgradde (36-40% fat)

UK: Whipping cream (35% fat)

USA:  Heavy Cream (35% fat)

RUSSIA:  Parmalat (35% fat)

Thanks to my subscribers for helping me compile this list.  If the country you live in has a different name for cream that is around 30-35% fat?  We’d love to know about it, let us know in the comments below.

203 Comments View Comments

  1. Israeli 42% cream

  2. American Heavy cream- generic store brand

  3. picture 2

  4. Well, here in Israel, it is called שמנת מתוקה (לקצפת)-42%
    As I spent many years in the USA, I can tell you that it would be called Heavy Whipping cream, in most stores- not to be confused with canned Whip!

  5. I can’t find any for the USA could you post a picture?

    • This is the Roundy’s brand- found in the Midwest, although others should look similar

  6. hi ann, I am your recent fan. I noticed you have mentioned a non dairy cream for my country. I am from India. It’s a land of cows, buffalos, goats, camels also yaks. different regions have different milk specialities. All over India, milk, cream, and cottage cheese are used in fantastic ways to make sweets and desserts.. just saying you hurt my indian pride by mentioning a non dairy cream, what a sacrilege! 🙂

    • but of course its very considerate of you to go through so much trouble and include so many options for people living in various countries.. the pic I have attached is only the most widely popular brand, there are many many others too.

  7. I was struggling with what is a “cream” in my country, after reading this page and since I know Russian and Polish brands I can tell you, if anyone asks, that a “cream” in Croatia is a “Vrhnje za Šlag”.

    Photo:
    Brzo & Fino – vrhnje za šlag 36% m.m.

  8. And for Spain? :'(

  9. Thank you so much for including Saudi Arabia! We tend to be left behind 🙂 I really appreciate it!

  10. Hi! In Slovakia we call it “šľahačková smotana” or “smotana na šľahanie” 🙂

  11. Here in Austria it’s usually called Schlagobers

    • (forgot to add picture)

  12. In Serbia (and Croatia, Montenegro, Bosnia) it’s called “slatka pavlaka”.
    In Serbia, the brand of choice is Imlek’s Moja kravica.

    • Hvala Ana zlato

  13. foot

    • lettuce

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